Chipotle and Black Bean Tempeh Chili

Chipotle and Black Bean Tempeh Chili

Chipotle and Black Bean Tempeh Chili

Making chili should be an easy, homemade treat, but chili competitions and throwdowns can make it feel like it should be Instagram-ble or complex. Typically meat is central to chili, yet this tempeh chili is a contest contender for a comforting, satisfying homecooked meal.

Even though it’s meatless, you end up with a dish that pays homage to chili flavors and textures but uses the plant-rich tempeh to boost fiber and nutrients.

Ultimately chili is about the flavor and texture. Make a sassy spice mix and create an appetizing chew or density and tempeh can sub in for a meat protein.

Ingredients

Spice Mix:
4 teaspoons chili powder (if mild, add more)
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon dried oregano
2 teaspoons smoked paprika
Tip: Make a double batch and store half for second chili batch or rub on other ingredients.

Chili Ingredients
2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound (2-8 ounce packets) soy or grain tempeh, crumbled by hand
1 medium yellow onion, diced (about 2 ½ cups)
3 medium-sized cloves of garlic, minced
Spice mix—about 3 tablespoons
1 tablespoon low-sodium tamari or soy sauce (of use ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt)
2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce–canned (about 2 tablespoons minced) (substitute—see notes)
3 cups water or vegetable stock
2 (15 ounce) cans petite diced tomatoes, undrained (or use diced tomatoes)
2 cans (15 ounce) black beans, liquid poured off or drained (see notes)
Juice of 1 lime (about 1 Tablespoon) (a second-best option is red or cider vinegar)
Optional Toppings: 1 avocado, diced, ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro, dab of Greek yogurt
Chipotle options: Substitute with chili flakes and smoked paprika

Steps

  1. Heat oil in a large pot (4-quart) over medium-high heat. Add crumbled tempeh to hot oil—do not stir. Stirring encourages steaming and reduces surface contact that browns the tempeh faster. Once it starts to brown, stir periodically while it browns in parts (about 5 minutes more). Reduce heat if it begins to stick or burn.
    2. With a spoon, push tempeh to the sides of the pan leaving the center of the pan exposed. Reduce the heat to low. To the center of the pan, add the onion, garlic, spices, tamari and chipotle. Stir the onion mix leaving the tempeh against the sides of the pan. Cook 5 minutes or until onions soften.
    3. Add the water and tomatoes. Bring to a rapid simmer, reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
    4. Add the black beans, stir and prepare the topping garnishes.
    5. Stir in the lime juice, taste and adjust seasoning if needed. Remove from the heat. Garnish each bowl with avocado and cilantro.

Tips

  • Wear gloves when handling chilies–the oils are difficult to wash off your fingers. Canned chipotle peppers (smoked jalapeños) in adobo sauce add heat and a smoky flavor and are available in supermarkets. Refrigerate extra in an airtight container for 1-2 weeks or 6 months in the freezer

BBQ Grilling Tips for Delicious Veggies: The Sweet and Meaty Taste Science of Grilled Vegetables

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About Me

"Let's connecting pleasure to wellbeing by making eating well and cooking easy" Dietitian Chef & Food Enjoyment Activist Michele Redmond
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Go-To BBQ Sauce: Smokey, Spicy, Tangy & Sweet

Go-To BBQ Sauce: Smokey, Spicy, Tangy & Sweet

Go-To BBQ Sauce: Smokey, Spicy, Tangy & Sweet

Creating a BBQ sauce recipe is basically asking for a culinary throwdown. With parts of our country owning different styles and declaring theirs as the best, I tread on hallowed ground. However, when I get a craving for BBQ, these are the ingredients that hit the flavor and taste points that I crave most, so after many requests for this sauce, I’ve finally dared to share my go-to BBQ sauce. 

a BBQ sauce recipe is basically asking for a culinary throwdown

4-Points BBQ Sauce: Smokey, Spicy, Tangy & Sweet

In this easy, quick sauce, you get a hint of acid (limes are great, but I’m using the pantry-ready vinegar option), a touch of tangy smokey heat from chipotles in adobo sauce (canned smoked jalapenos–another pantry item if you like heat), sweet and umami from ketchup plus smokey notes from paprika and liquid smoke).

And, yes, I’m also inviting a grammar controversy by going with “smokey” instead of “smoky”. I have a relative named Smokey, so maybe that’s why, plus in a grammar throwdown, “smokey” is now nearly as accepted as “smoky”–I know for sure, cuz I googled it.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
½ teaspoon liquid smoke (I like Wrights Natural Hickory Smoke)
2 cloves garlic, minced fine or grated on a microplane grater
½ cup of ketchup
2 teaspoons chipotle en adobo sauce (sauce or sauce and finely minced chilies)
1 teaspoon low-sodium tamari (a nice quality low-sodium soy sauce works also)
¼ teaspoon smoked paprika
Optional 1-2 teaspoons maple syrup or honey if sauce has a bitter or sour edge

Steps4-Points BBQ Sauce: Smokey, Spicy, Tangy & Sweet

  1. In a large bowl, mix together the Worchestershire sauce, vinegar, liquid smoke, garlic, ketchup, chipotle, tamari and paprika.
  2. Slather onto whatever strikes your fancy.

BBQ Sauce Serving Ideas & Notes

  • This can be kept in a jar or covered container for 7 days without much noticeable flavor losses.
  • I like Wrights Natural Hickory Smoke because it’s simply water and liquid smoke (I have no association with this brand)

BBQ Grilling Tips for Delicious Veggies: The Sweet and Meaty Taste Science of Grilled Vegetables

Opt-in HERE to Periodic updates on recipes, culinary nutrition and simple ways to eat well and enjoy good food

About Me

"Let's connecting pleasure to wellbeing by making eating well and cooking easy" Dietitian Chef & Food Enjoyment Activist Michele Redmond
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Lazy, Lighter Chocolat Chaud—Hot Chocolate with French Airs

Lazy, Lighter Chocolat Chaud—Hot Chocolate with French Airs

Lazy, Lighter Chocolat Chaud—Hot Chocolate with French Airs

Chocolate chaud hot chocolate cup TheTasteWorkshop.comIt snowed in the desert on National Margarita day. Neither event makes sense—a beach-boozy drink celebrated in winter and snow-covered cactus. Instead of tequila, my beverage is based on chocolate liquor—the meat of the cocoa bean.

Any cold day seems a good day for a hot chocolate break or breakfast treat to warm your body and soul. To help with that, I’m sharing this chocolat chaud recipe that I’ve tested until woozy with cocoa to get it just right, even if not exactly French.

Is this even French?

Enjoy rich foods fearlessly and without excuses! If only we could do this more often. Such a French food attitude wouldn’t need a “lighter” hot chocolate—Non Merci! You would instead sip traditional chocolat chaud, intentionally, slowly and happily—just enough to satisfy without feeling heavy.

I didn’t see “light” versions of chocolat chaud when I lived in France. Certainly not made in a microwave—not a classic French culinary move. So why create a lazy, lighter version? Because sometimes simplicity reigns and this three-ingredient version delivers on flavor and comfort.

In the U.S., hot chocolate may contain milk, water or both with cocoa powder or syrups instead of chocolate. French recipes include milk most often, sometimes cream, but milk paired with a high-quality dark chocolate is rich enough.

Is this even Chocolate?

As a kid, I reveled in making my own hot chocolate. Add a packet of cakey cocoa with chalky, sweet white bits to a cup, stir in hot water and voilà—chocolate for breakfast.

I loved this astronaut-ready freeze-dried instant hot beverage. Especially after meeting an astronaut who I was certain sucked up hot chocolate and marshmallow bits in zero-gravity.

Chocolate chaud Hot Chocolate TheTasteWorkshop.comIn college, I graduated from “milk chocolate-flavor cocoa mix” to Nestle’s chocolate syrup with hot milk. The cocoa mix has 16 ingredients and the syrup has 12, three of which are food colors.

If you grew up enjoying these options, then ignore the ingredient list–just enjoy it as a periodic treat. For me, everything changed when my friend Michel treated me to Chocolat Chaud in Paris at his quiet neighborhood bistro.

Liquid Chocolate

The best part of chocolat chaud that I’ve loved, is at the bottom of the cup. A morsel of soft, not fully melted, chocolate lingers. This “Pièce de Résistance” (proof of real chocolate), leaves you a couple spoonfuls of thick chocolate or sips of thick cocoa tonic to boost your mood.

Unlike the drinkable chocolate bar offered at the famous Angelina’s in Paris, most versions of hot chocolate I enjoy in Paris are neither thick nor super rich. Sometimes, whipped cream decorates the top, but for me, that’s just a pretty distraction diluting the cocoa flavor.  But I get grumpy when cold, so just ignore my whinging and bling up with dairy delights as you wish.

Chocolat Chaud Recipe

Hot milk mixed with dark chocolate pieces plus a hint of sugar to balance the bitter dark chocolate.

Ingredients

3 ounces dark chocolate, chopped (about ½ cup—see notes for chocolate and chips)

1 ½ cup skim milk (see milk option notes below)

2 teaspoons powdered sugar (thickens drink & balances bitter notes in chocolate)

Dark chocolate options—3 ounces of:

  • 70% bittersweet chocolate bar (about ½ cup chopped). I like Valhrona (6 ½ squares is about 3 ounces), but pick any high-quality chocolate you like.
  • Dark chocolate chips (about ½ cup) tend to be only 60% dark chocolate, are sweeter, have a lighter chocolate flavor and different nutrient profile.

Steps:

  1. For your your pièce de résistance, pull aside about ⅓ (about 1 ounce or 2 tablespoons) of the chopped chocolate or chocolate chips, and divide between two small tea or coffee cups.
  2. In a glass measuring cup (at least 2 cups), add 1 ½ cups milk. Microwave on high for 3 minutes.
  3. To the milk, add the remaining chocolate (about 2 ounces left) and powdered sugar. Whisk or stir with a metal spoon scraping any chocolate that sticks to the sides or bottom. Taste. If the taste is a bit bitter, add more powdered sugar–each teaspoon is only 10 calories. Microwave for 1 more minute, whisk or stir vigorously until frothy. 
  4. Pour in equal amounts into the cups each with the chocolate pieces waiting to be partially melted. No need to stir, unless you want a thicker drink. Find a cozy, quiet place to enjoy or share with kids or other adults and let time stop a moment to create a chocolatey memory.

Chocolate chaud Hot Chocolate TheTasteWorkshop.com

Milk Notes

  • Skim milk texture is thinner than whole milk, but the powdered sugar versus a crystalized sugar acts as a thickener.
  • If you use whole milk, it can bubble over, and possibly erupt in the microwave, so reduce the heat or the time to control this.

Serving & Make-Ahead notes:

  • Serve warm in the smallest coffee or tea cups you have (demitasse cups if you’re into French dishes).
  • If making ahead of serving, put in the refrigerator for a few hours or even overnight. Rewarm and stir before serving. The chocolate pièce de résistance will likely melt though, so you can leave that out, warm the cocoa, then add the extra chocolate to the cup.
  • If you don’t’ have a microwave, go old school and heat milk in a pot, add chocolate and reduce until thicker.

Calorie Notes–Urg. I hesitate to share since this beverage isn’t about watching calories, but it is a rich treat, so here’s some specs:

  • Skim milk calories versus whole milk for this recipe is about 50 more calories per cup.
  • Because this is a rich beverage, use small cups and enjoy slowly. Each serving is about 300 calories—just a bit more a Starbucks 16-ounce version at 400 calories, but it’s a different taste and flavor option.

About Me

"Let's connecting pleasure to wellbeing by making eating well and cooking easy" Dietitian Chef & Food Enjoyment Activist Michele Redmond
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Easy homemade Honeycomb for a Flavorful Sweet Treat

Easy homemade Honeycomb for a Flavorful Sweet Treat

Easy homemade Honeycomb for a Flavorful Sweet Treat

Cinder Toffee from Royal Highlands Fair in Scotland

Cinder Toffee from Royal Highlands Fair in Scotland

I ate honeycomb for the first time at the Royal Highlands show in Scotland where it was called cinder toffee. I adopted a Scottish accent after the first bite.

I’d eaten honeycomb-covered chocolate bars in London, but fresh-made honeycomb had heady aromas of caramel, toffee, butter, smoky flavors and a hint of bitter. All of these qualities make it a perfect garnish for flavor-forward desserts.

Honeycomb is also known as hokey pokey (New Zealand and Australia) and tire-éponge (Quebec/France). This recipe was provided by a pastry chef who specializes in flavorful foods. Chef Country Velador of New Wave Market and Super Chunk Sweets & Treats shared her recipe scaled down for home-kitchen use.

Ingredients (Super Chunk Sweets & Treats Recipe)
1 tablespoon baking soda
½ cup water
⅓ cup honey
¼ cup corn syrup
1½ cup sugar

Steps

Honeycomb from Superchunk Sweets and Treats

Superchunk Sweets & Treats Restaurant Quantity

  1. Line baking sheet with a silpat and set aside. Measure out the baking soda and leave next to the sheet pan with a whisk.
  2. In a large saucepan (final mixture will foam up dramatically), combine the water, honey, and corn syrup. Stir to dissolve the honey and corn syrup as much as you can. Add the sugar and carefully stir in, being careful not to get sugar on the sides of the pan. Put on the stove over high heat.
  3. Bring the mixture to a boil and clip on a candy thermometer. Cook until the candy thermometer reads 305F.
  4. Take the pot next to the silpat and pour in the baking soda and quickly whisk it in. The honeycomb will puff up. Quickly pour it out onto the silpat, pouring all of the candy right in the center of the pan.
  5. Let cool completely before breaking up. Store in an airtight container.

Honeycomb goes a long way as a garnish for cakes or cupcakes icing, paired with chocolate, tucked in a yogurt, fruit parfait or sprinkled on ice cream or roasted bananas. Cook some up and play with it.

Eat within a few days or share with people to increase your popularity immensely. If it sits too long, it begins to absorb moisture from the air quickly and becomes sticky and soft. Don’t store in the fridge for the same reason, and wrap it in plastic wrap after it has completely dried to avoid exposure to moisture.

Honeycomb by Superchunk Sweets and Treats

About Me

"Let's connecting pleasure to wellbeing by making eating well and cooking easy" Dietitian Chef & Food Enjoyment Activist Michele Redmond
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Artichoke Puttanesca–Forget its Saucy Reputation

Artichoke Puttanesca–Forget its Saucy Reputation

Artichoke Puttanesca–Forget its Saucy Reputation

Serves 6 as a complete meal with the pasta option

A delicious mix of tangy, spicy and savory ingredients makes Puttanesca sauce (sugo alla puttanesca) a meal-time habit that can be made from your pantry. This popular Italian sauce commonly pairs with pasta but consider using it as a topping for pizzas, tartines, a side salad and with grilled salmon.

Artichoke Puttanesca

Its reputation of being linked to red-light district “workers” isn’t deserved.

Puttana translates to prostitute, but puttanata is associated with as in “rubbish” or “crap” as in someone tossing together whatever stuff (puttanatta qualsiasi) they can find in the pantry to cook.

Cooking from the pantry or “whatever” ingredients you have around is a key reason this is a favorite meal in my house.

The adjective form of the noun, puttanesca has become popularized for this dish and alla like the French à la, simply means “in the style of”.

This is not traditional puttanesca sauce if you want to pay tribute to the most authentic forms of it; however, it retains key flavor and texture elements. The changes I’ve made are:

  • I use peperoncini’s instead of red chile flakes as I wanted some green colors and heat that came with a bright briny tang.
  • I substitute in green olives, again for color, and because I like the flavors more than the traditional black olives used.
  • I’ve not added onions although these would be nice, I’m sticking with ingredients that one finds in cans, jars or bottles in their pantry or have long shelf life like garlic.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 (2 ounce) can anchovies
3 tablespoons capers (nonpareil–small ones), rinsed well (the brine is not pleasant tasting)
5 large cloves garlic, minced (about 2 tablespoons)
½ cup pitted Spanish or Greek olives, chopped
1 (28-ounce) can diced (fire roasted are a nice touch), crushed or whole tomatoes
8 medium Peperoncinis, caps removed, sliced
10 ounces high fiber rigatoni (chunky pasta for a chunky sauce)
2 (14-ounce) cans of artichoke hearts, squeezed to reduce liquids and cut in half
Substitutions:
for peperoncinis: use ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes (traditional for this dish)
for green olives, use kalamate or black (traditional for this dish)
Optional non-pantry items: ¼ cup Basil, chiffonade ribbons

Steps

  1. Prepare the capers, garlic, olives, peperoncinis and artichokes.
  2. Heat the oil in a large skillet (large enough to hold the cooked pasta) over medium heat. Add the anchovies, capers and garlic, sauté about 2 minutes.
  3. Add the olives, tomatoes (if whole tomatoes, crush in your hands and include juice from the can) and peperoncinis and cook until sauce is bubbling. Reduce to medium-low heat and simmer for 15 minutes or until sauce has thickened—it may bubble and spit a bit.
  4. While sauce is reducing, start the pasta. Over high heat, bring a large pot of water to a boil (pasta will soak up the seasoned sauce, so salted water is optional), add pasta, Cook until nearly al dente.
  5. When sauce is thickened and just before adding the pasta, add the artichoke hearts and stir.
  6. When the pasta is done, drain it or lift it with a pasta spoon and add it to the sauce, gently mixing with the sauce to combine.

Serving Ideas

  • Instead of using pasta in this dish, serve as a side dish, serve with pan-seared or grilled salmon, or use as a topping for pizza or tartines.

Artichoke Puttanesca | TheTasteWorkshop.com

About Me

"Let's connecting pleasure to wellbeing by making eating well and cooking easy" Dietitian Chef & Food Enjoyment Activist Michele Redmond
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

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