Chickpea Corn Cakes: Crave-worthy Carbs

Chickpea Corn Cakes: Crave-worthy Carbs

Chickpea Corn Cakes: Crave-worthy Carbs

chickpea corn cakes top

If you enjoy crunchy, sweet summer corn and savory, nutty chickpea flavors and a fast, easy recipe, continue. However, I feel compelled to defend corn just in case with this comment:

Carby chickpea corn cakes cause carb-avoiders cringe-worthy concerns, or conversely, conscious cravings. Now breathe.

 

Corn often gets dissed as low-nutrient, high-starch food, but this oversimplifies corn’s dietary profile.

chickpea corn cakes

Instead corn’s a good source of fiber, micronutrients and minerals that connect to health benefits.

As for corn cravings, sweet corn is a comfort food that connects us to summer and chowing down on a cob is just plain fun. Corn’s also a good source of umami offering savory, meaty flavors.

 

The Chickpea Ingredient

The chickpea in this recipe is from chickpea flour (besan or gram flour), a nutrient-rich, gluten-free flour. In these egg-free corn cakes, the sticky bean flour is a primary binding agent.

Enjoy corn cakes as an appetizer with a dollop of lemon yogurt sauce, garlic and walnut herb sauce or a salsa or as a dinner with a side salad.

 

Chickpea Corn Cakes

Yield: Makes 18-20

Ingredients

4 ears of corn (about 2 pounds trimmed or about 3 cups of kernels)
1½ cup chickpea flour
⅓ cup sweet rice flour
1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 tablespoons ground sumac (a citrus-like flavor, but is optional)
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper (or ½ teaspoon for more hint of heat)
¾ to 1 cup water
1 large shallot, minced (about ⅓ cup)  (or ¼ of a small yellow onion)
4 tablespoons organic canola oil

Prep Steps  

  1. Shuck corn if needed, cut off kernels (hold stalk upright in the center of a tea towel and use a chef knife to strip off kernels). If using canned corn, drain and pat dry the kernels.
  2. In a bowl, stir together chickpea flour, rice flour, baking powder, salt, sumac and cayenne.
  3. Add water, shallot and corn. Mix with a spoon until blended. If not using immediately, refrigerate for 20 minutes or overnight to make forming patties easier.
  4. Form palm-sized patties about 1/2” thick with an even surface for nice browning. In a large skillet, heat the oil over a medium-heat burner until it shimmers. Add patties leaving space between them, cook until each side is a dark brown color. Place on paper towels and repeat.
  5. Serve hot or at room temperature—see serving ideas below.

Serving Ideas & Nutrition Bonus:

Serve with dips sauces or topped with tangy Greek yogurt, Garlicky cheese-free pesto or a chunky-tomato ragout.

Nutrition bonus: for 4 corn cakes: Fiber 9 grams (woohoo) and 10 grams protein for only 236 calories

Like Chickpea flour? Also try my Chickpea shrimp fritters

Like the pan? I don’t represent Lodge cast iron, but do recommend them: more info here

    About Me

    The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
    Michele Redmond

    Michele Redmond

    French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

    It's about Making Food First

    Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

    Quinoa Boulettes vs Ikea Swedish Meatballs

    Quinoa Boulettes vs Ikea Swedish Meatballs

    Quinoa Boulettes vs Ikea Swedish Meatballs

    Mom would make Swedish meatballs for parties yet we weren’t Swedish, didn’t know anyone who was and Ikea was a two-day plane trip. Several decades later, braving my first trip to the hip-mega-everything store in search of kitchen doodads, I got overwhelmed and lost, but ended up following an aroma to the food court. I knew the source. I had rediscovered Swedish meatballs and memories of meatball platters, gravy and happy eaters.

    Quinoa Boulettes Green Sauc

     

    With this recipe, I’ve kept the appetizer angle of my childhood Swedish meatballs yet nixed the meat. However, calling them quinoa “meatballs” without using meat smells of “bait and switch” tactics. Instead, I embraced a European makeover by turning them into boulettes, a French culinary term, for small ball-shaped foods.

    As a plant-based omnivore, I recognize meatballs have their own special textures and flavors. The chewy Swedish ones of my childhood oozed buttery-fat flavors but, I’ve served these multiple times to meat-centric eaters who enjoyed the crispy exterior and moist, flavorful interior. I just didn’t promise “hey they taste just like meat”.

    Serve these quinoa boulettes as a complete meal with noodles and marinara or as a crunchy, healthy nibble to dip into an herby Greek yogurt, spicy marinara or garlicky vegan walnut pesto.

    Quinoa Boulettes

    Yield: Makes 35

    Quinoa Ingredients  (makes about 2 ¾ cups cooked. Can be done up to two days in advance)

    1 cup dry red quinoa (white or black works but red looks “meatier”)
    2 cups liquid (water or low-salt vegetable stock)
    ½ teaspoon salt

    Boulette Ingredients 

    ¾ cup bread crumbs (not panko)
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon sumac or other spice (see notes)
    ½ teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika or other spice (see notes)
    ¼ teaspoon of cayenne
    3 garlic cloves, minced very fine (about 1½ teaspoon)
    3 large eggs
    ¼ small yellow onion, minced very fine (about ⅓ cup)
    1 teaspoon canola or vegetable oil (for high smoke point)

    Prepping Quinoa 

    1. To a pot over medium-high heat, add quinoa, water and salt.
    2. When boiling, stir quinoa, reduce heat to low and cover with a lid.
    3. Cook 18-20 minutes or until no water remains in the pan.
    4. Remove quinoa from heat, leave covered 5 minutes, then uncover, use a fork to fluff it.

    Making Quinoa Boulettes:

    1. Turn oven to 475˚F. Place one rack at middle position and one at the top position. Lightly oil a baking sheet. To a mixing bowl, add bread crumbs, salt and spices and mix. Add cooled quinoa, garlic, eggs and onion and mix with a spoon.
    2. If you have time to let the quinoa cool, place in refrigerator for 30 minutes to let breadcrumbs soften and make shaping easier.
    3. With a 1 tablespoon measure, scoop slightly heaping amounts of quinoa, pressing into the measuring spoon with your palm to compact it, then push it into your palm to form a 1 ¼”-1 ½” size ball (smaller than a golf ball). Place on baking sheet.
    4. On the middle rack, cook 8-12 minutes or until exterior firms up and base browns. Move to top rack, cook 6-8 minutes or until crispy and dark brown. Broil for 2-3 minutes if not dark enough.
    5. Remove from oven and baking sheet to serve warm or store in refrigerator for later use.

    Quinoa Boulettes Green Sauce F

    Spice and Serving options:

    • Savory spice options: sumac, Hungarian or California paprika (sweet pepper flavor, not smoked), zatar spice or different powdered chilies instead of cayenne are possibilities.
    • These are popular with spiced Greek yogurt dips or the walnut herb sauce I make that is like a pesto without cheese.

     

      About Me

      The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.

      Let’s Connect

      Michele Redmond

      Michele Redmond

      French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

      It's about Making Food First

      Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

      Fast Flatbread 3 Ways–Watch out Pizza

      Fast Flatbread 3 Ways–Watch out Pizza

      Fast Flatbread 3 Ways–Watch out Pizza

      Fast Flatbread 3 Ways

      (makes 6 one-person servings)

      Flatbread, is quicker to make than its cousin–pizza. It doesn’t require careful measuring, sifted flour or yeast and doesn’t make you wait. It’s five minutes from your pantry to a lump of dough ready to be pressed flat.

      Fast flatbread works as an “in-a-pinch” pizza or as an appetizer cut into wedges for hummus. Roll it extra thin, and you get a cracker texture when cooked to be crisp.

      Flatbread tomato zucchini

      This recipe suggests using whole wheat flour to boost flavor and add additional nutrient-rich elements. It’s a forgiving recipe, so substitute in additional whole wheat flour for all-purpose flour or vice versa if you prefer less whole-wheat.

      Fast Flatbread dough ingredients

      1 cup all-purpose flour
      ½ cup whole wheat flour (or use all-purpose flour if whole wheat isn’t available)
      ½ teaspoon salt (can use less if the whole wheat taste is not too strong)*
      ¾ cup water

      *Whole wheat flour can have bitter notes for some people

      Dough Steps:

      1. Stir the flours and salt together in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Add the water and stir with a large spoon into a lumpy ball shape. If the dough looks dry, add more water or if too sticky, sprinkle with some flour.
      2. Place the dough on a lightly floured countertop. Knead a few times to make the dough more uniform and smooth. Form the dough into a hot-dog bun shape. With a knife, divide into 6 equal circle-shaped slices.
      3. Lightly flour each slice before flattening them into about 8-inch rounds with a rolling pin. Check periodically that they aren’t sticking to the counter. Roll them until quite thin, about 1/8 inch.

      Flatbread Preparation Options:

      Pizza Stone:  Heat oven to 500˚F with pizza stone for at least 30 minutes on the middle rack. Cut some parchment paper to fit on the pizza stone and place on a pizza peel or a rimless baking sheet. Move some of the flatbread to the parchment paper, add toppings and slide onto the hot pizza stone along with the parchment paper. Cook for 6-8 minutes or until done edges are crisp and the center feels firm.

      Oven: Heat the oven to 500˚F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper. After the flatbreads are rolled out, place them on the baking sheet and add toppings. Cook in the oven on the middle rack 10-12 minutes or until done edges are crisp and the center feels firm.

      Pan-fried on CooktopOver medium-heat, briefly warm a skillet. Add 2 teaspoons of high-heat cooking oil such as refined organic canola oil or vegetable oil. Once oil is hot, place a flatbread in the skillet. Cook until it begins to look light brown around the edges and underneath—about 1 minute. Using tongs, flip and cook another 1 minute or until cooked. Remove and place on a plate lined with a paper towel and cover with another paper towel. Repeat with remaining flatbreads.

      Simple Topping Suggestions

      3 plum tomatoes, cut into ¼ inch half-moon shapes
      1 large red or orange pepper, chopped or julienne style
      1 medium Italian (green) or yellow zucchini, chopped or cut into half-moon shapes or quarters
      6 ounces low-fat or skim-milk mozzarella cheese (about 1 ½ cup shredded)
      Optional vegetables: Spinach, corn, broccoli, green peppers, red onions, olives, chilies, sun-dried tomatoes
      Optional herbs or spices: fresh thyme or basil, chilie flakes, dried oregano

      Flatbread tomato zucchini

        About Me

        The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
        Michele Redmond

        Michele Redmond

        French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

        It's about Making Food First

        Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

        Citrus and Almond Olive Oil Cake with Tangerine Glaze

        Citrus and Almond Olive Oil Cake with Tangerine Glaze

        Citrus and Almond Olive Oil Cake with Tangerine Glaze

        This isn’t a typical olive oil cake. Often they are dense and extra unctuous, which can be desirable, or lighter and cake-like. This version is in between thanks to a flavorful addition of moist almond meal and corn meal. These additions also create a nutrient-rich cake as well.

        Despite a moist interior, the top of the cake develops a nice crust which holds up well to an addition of almonds and a grand marnier tangerine glaze. If tangerines are not in season, substitute with the related mandarin or clementines or “cousin” orange.

        While I recommend following measurements when baking, I made this cake for a taste workshop and class at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris without the benefit of measuring tools or scales, so either it’s very forgiving or I made lots of lucky estimates that day.

        Recipe for Cake

        Olive oil cake cupDry Ingredients 1 ¾ cup ground almond meal/flour ¾  cup fine ground corn meal 1/3 cup all-purpose flour 2  teaspoons baking powder ½  teaspoon fine sea salt 1  cup sugar

        The Topping: ¼ cup slivered almonds

        Moist Ingredients ¾ cup extra virgin olive oil 3 large eggs 3-4 Tangerines (2 tangelos or oranges): 2 teaspoons zest for cake 1/3 cup tangerine juice for cake

        Glaze Ingredients: 1 ¼ cup powdered sugar 1 teaspoon tangerine/citrus zest, finely grated 2 tangerines (3-4 Tablespoons) 2 teaspoons Grand Marnier Small pinch of salt

        Steps: Pre-heat oven to 350˚F

        1. Lightly coat the base and sides of a 9-inch nonstick cake pan or a quick-release version.
        2. In a mixing bowl, add flours and whisk well to remove lumps. Add the salt and baking powder and mix well. Add the sugar and mix in.
        3. To an equally large or larger mixing bowl, add the moist ingredients. With a hand mixer, blend the eggs and oil for 2 minutes on medium speed (will form bubbles on the surface).
        4. Add the zest and juice and blend only a few seconds—a moist custard-like texture quickly forms.
        5. Add the dry mixture into the wet mixture and blend until incorporated. It has a cornmeal batter texture.
        6. Pour the batter into the oiled cake pan and bake on the center rack for 48-50 minutes until a toothpick comes out clean. Place on a rack to cool and run a knife round the edges to loosen.
        7. Sprinkle the almond slices on top of the cake.
        8. For the glaze, pour the powdered sugar into a bowl, add juice, zest, Grand Marnier and salt and mix.
        9. Pour some of the glaze on top of the almonds while the cake still a bit warm and retain some glaze to serve aside cut pieces of the cake.
        • A moderately flavored olive oil works best to infuse the cake with a hint of savory flavor; however, you can use a mild tasting extra virgin olive oil for a mild or even undetectable flavor.

         

          About Me

          The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
          Michele Redmond

          Michele Redmond

          French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

          It's about Making Food First

          Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

          Golden Horseradish Hummus

          Golden Horseradish Hummus

          Golden Horseradish Hummus

          Golden Horseradish Hummus

          Hummus needs chickpeas. I’ve met modern interpretations at restaurants and was disappointed when I could find no trace or taste of it.

          Chickpeas have a distinct flavor and, culturally, if chickpeas are subbed out for other beans, you have bean dip, not hummus. Hummus “means chickpea in Arabic” so if you want authenticity, stick with the chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans).

          Tahini, sesame paste, is also a sign of authenticity in hummus. For “proof”, click to see a short video spoof on commercially made versus homemade hummus–Warning the tune is addictive (earworm alert):

          Authentic hummus “It’s all about the paste”

          However, getting off my high horse on hummus etiquette, there are fun non-traditional flavors that make traditional hummus playful. In this version, I’ve swapped out garlic for a horseradish hummus. Horseradish is a root vegetable in the mustard family. Its root heritage makes it a piquant spice plus it offers multiple health benefits.

          This recipe also includes turmeric which blings out the color with a golden hue as well as adding interesting nutritional qualities. Lastly, this version has about half the oil as most hummus recipes without sacrificing flavor or texture.

          Golden Horseradish Hummus

           Golden Horseradish Hummus 

          Makes about 2 cups

          Ingredients:

          • 1 (15-ounce) can garbanzo beans (about 2 cups drained)
          • 2-3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (about 1 large lemon)
          • 2 tablespoons “prepared horseradish” (see notes below)
          • ¼ cup tahini
          • ½ teaspoon turmeric
          • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne
          • 3 tablespoons water
          • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
          • ⅛ teaspoon fine sea salt

          Steps:

          1. Drain the chickpeas and rinse. Reserve a few whole garbanzo beans for garnish.
          2. Combine the chickpeas with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor and blend to a creamy purée. You want a very smooth texture. If the texture is too thick, add a bit more water or olive oil. Tahini comes in varying degrees of textures.
          3. Taste and season further if needed.

          To serve, spread in a platter or put in a shallow bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, some chickpeas and serve with warmed flat breads or pita bread cut into quarters or with vegetable crudité.

            Golden Horseradish Hummus

          Substitutions: Taste and Nutrition considerations:

          • Horseradish “heat”: as with some other root vegetables, horseradish spicy or piquant notes increase with the amount of processing such as chopping, grinding, grating. A very finely grated horseradish will be spicier than the chopped root. The “heat” is from a volatile oil compound called isothiocyanate.
          • Types of Horseradish: “Prepared” or jarred horseradish” varies significantly in ingredients used, quality and flavor profiles. Refrigerated (fresh horseradish) has a shorter shelf life than the non-refrigerated options.
          • Ingredients: Shelf-stable options can include a variety of additional ingredients with some brands include eggs, artificial flavoring, preservatives such as sodium benzoate and extra oils. Also check the ingredient list for sugar or corn syrups (preservative roles) which can add an odd flavor to hummus.
          • Options: These extra ingredients aren’t offering any health benefits and alter the natural flavor and texture of horseradish. For a better quality product, consider the refrigerated versions which are most likely simply grated horseradish, salt and vinegar. The vinegar helps stabilize the volatile oils (released from grating the root) so that the “heat” doesn’t continue to evolve.

          More horseradish info at Food & Nutrition Magazine Savor Horseradish

          • Instead of a dip, use as a sandwich condiment spread
          • Use as in a layered veggie salad dish alternating the hummus with cucumbers, shredded carrots, peppers etc.
          • Use as a “mash” type of substitute to serve with other foods e.g. roasted vegetables or chicken.
          • Storage: Whether using prepared or homemade horseradish store in the refrigerator for 4-6 months or in the freezer for longer. I’ve kept fresh roots in the vegetable tray for up to 6 weeks.

          Thank you, horseradish, for being neither a radish nor a horse.

          What you are is a liar food.

          Jimmy Fallon

            About Me

            The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
            Michele Redmond

            Michele Redmond

            French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

            It's about Making Food First

            Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

            Easy French Brown-Butter Tart

            Easy French Brown-Butter Tart

            Easy French Brown-Butter Tart

            Easy French Brown-Butter Tart

            For bakers and home cooks who bake often, making tarts is easy enough. However, not everyone, including me, appreciates the specific measuring and techniques required for good tart dough. Now, after discovering this easy brown-butter tart, I’m dreaming of future tarts.

            The dough is similar to a pâte sablée (“sandy” dough). It’s tender and crumbly like shortbread, holds its shape well and has a delicate brown-butter flavor. So, while it won’t replace all varieties of tart options, it can substitute for many sweet and savory versions.

            I discovered this recipe while reading a post by David Lebovitz who wrote that upon hearing about this:

            ”I almost started choking. “Surely, you jest!” I wanted to cry out in disbelief”…”It was all just crazy-talk.”

            The source, Paule Caillet of Promenades Gourmandes, is a culinary instructor I know through her Paris market tour cooking classes. The recipe works well, but after multiple tests, I made a couple minor ingredient revisions and heated the butter mixture on a cooktop rather than in the oven.

            Brown-Butter tart

            Brown-Butter Tart Recipe

            Serves 8

            Adapted from a recipe by Paule Caillat of Promenades Gourmandes

            Ingredients:
            • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter (3 ounces or 85g) cut into chunks
            • 1 tablespoon flavorless cooking oil such as grapeseed or organic canola
            • 1 tablespoon sugar (5 ounces or about 142g)
            • ⅛ teaspoon fine sea salt (about 3 pinches)
            • 1 cup of all-purpose flour (5.5 ounces or 156g)
            Steps:
            1. Butter a 9” (23cm) tart pan (removable bottom is best) and turn oven to 400˚F (204˚C).
            2. Add butter, oil, sugar and salt to a 6-8” pot or rounded sauce pan and turn heat to medium heat.
            3. Foam and bubbles will begin to form as the water evaporates from the butter. When butter is melted (about 3 minutes) briefly stir to mix ingredients and let cook for 4-6 minutes more or until you see a tan color form in the center or around the edges. At this point remove from the heat as this tan color can quickly overcook to a dark brown (a Beurre noir) sauce.
            4. Remove the pot from the burner, add the flour and stir with a soup spoon (works best) or spoonula until the dough begins to pull away from the sides and stick together. Place the dough into the center of the tart pan and spread it across the base with the back of the spoon.
            5. When the dough is still warm but cool enough to touch, press it with your fingers spreading it evenly across the base (it will be thin) and up the sides.
            6. With a fork, prick around the dough base about twenty times, then bake on the center rack for 8-10 minutes or until the tart dough is golden brown. Once the tart is cool, fill to your delight.
            • If you use a dark pot it will be hard to see when the butter is the proper color.
            • Whole wheat substitutions will not yield the same flavor or texture.
            • European butters or Kerry Gold Irish butter for example, have lower water content than most commercial American butters. This may increase the evaporation time a bit during browning and may cause the mixture to “spit” or “pop” hot liquid a bit. Swirl the pan once or twice if this happens to reduce “spitting”.
            • The tart base can be prepared a day in advance
            • Use as a savory tart base as well but leaving out the sugar. Sugar does affect dough structure, so it will not be the exact same tart base, but it will work.

            The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All of a summer day: The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts And took them quite away!

            1865  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

              About Me

              The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
              Michele Redmond

              Michele Redmond

              French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

              It's about Making Food First

              Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

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