Fast Flatbread 3 Ways–Watch out Pizza

Fast Flatbread 3 Ways–Watch out Pizza

Fast Flatbread 3 Ways–Watch out Pizza

Fast Flatbread 3 Ways

(makes 6 one-person servings)

Flatbread, is quicker to make than its cousin–pizza. It doesn’t require careful measuring, sifted flour or yeast and doesn’t make you wait. It’s five minutes from your pantry to a lump of dough ready to be pressed flat.

Fast flatbread works as an “in-a-pinch” pizza or as an appetizer cut into wedges for hummus. Roll it extra thin, and you get a cracker texture when cooked to be crisp.

Flatbread tomato zucchini

This recipe suggests using whole wheat flour to boost flavor and add additional nutrient-rich elements. It’s a forgiving recipe, so substitute in additional whole wheat flour for all-purpose flour or vice versa if you prefer less whole-wheat.

Fast Flatbread dough ingredients

1 cup all-purpose flour
½ cup whole wheat flour (or use all-purpose flour if whole wheat isn’t available)
½ teaspoon salt (can use less if the whole wheat taste is not too strong)*
¾ cup water

*Whole wheat flour can have bitter notes for some people

Dough Steps:

  1. Stir the flours and salt together in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Add the water and stir with a large spoon into a lumpy ball shape. If the dough looks dry, add more water or if too sticky, sprinkle with some flour.
  2. Place the dough on a lightly floured countertop. Knead a few times to make the dough more uniform and smooth. Form the dough into a hot-dog bun shape. With a knife, divide into 6 equal circle-shaped slices.
  3. Lightly flour each slice before flattening them into about 8-inch rounds with a rolling pin. Check periodically that they aren’t sticking to the counter. Roll them until quite thin, about 1/8 inch.

Flatbread Preparation Options:

Pizza Stone:  Heat oven to 500˚F with pizza stone for at least 30 minutes on the middle rack. Cut some parchment paper to fit on the pizza stone and place on a pizza peel or a rimless baking sheet. Move some of the flatbread to the parchment paper, add toppings and slide onto the hot pizza stone along with the parchment paper. Cook for 6-8 minutes or until done edges are crisp and the center feels firm.

Oven: Heat the oven to 500˚F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper. After the flatbreads are rolled out, place them on the baking sheet and add toppings. Cook in the oven on the middle rack 10-12 minutes or until done edges are crisp and the center feels firm.

Pan-fried on CooktopOver medium-heat, briefly warm a skillet. Add 2 teaspoons of high-heat cooking oil such as refined organic canola oil or vegetable oil. Once oil is hot, place a flatbread in the skillet. Cook until it begins to look light brown around the edges and underneath—about 1 minute. Using tongs, flip and cook another 1 minute or until cooked. Remove and place on a plate lined with a paper towel and cover with another paper towel. Repeat with remaining flatbreads.

Simple Topping Suggestions

3 plum tomatoes, cut into ¼ inch half-moon shapes
1 large red or orange pepper, chopped or julienne style
1 medium Italian (green) or yellow zucchini, chopped or cut into half-moon shapes or quarters
6 ounces low-fat or skim-milk mozzarella cheese (about 1 ½ cup shredded)
Optional vegetables: Spinach, corn, broccoli, green peppers, red onions, olives, chilies, sun-dried tomatoes
Optional herbs or spices: fresh thyme or basil, chilie flakes, dried oregano

Flatbread tomato zucchini

    About Me

    The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
    Michele Redmond

    Michele Redmond

    French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

    It's about Making Food First

    Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

    Golden Horseradish Hummus

    Golden Horseradish Hummus

    Golden Horseradish Hummus

    Golden Horseradish Hummus

    Hummus needs chickpeas. I’ve met modern interpretations at restaurants and was disappointed when I could find no trace or taste of it.

    Chickpeas have a distinct flavor and, culturally, if chickpeas are subbed out for other beans, you have bean dip, not hummus. Hummus “means chickpea in Arabic” so if you want authenticity, stick with the chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans).

    Tahini, sesame paste, is also a sign of authenticity in hummus. For “proof”, click to see a short video spoof on commercially made versus homemade hummus–Warning the tune is addictive (earworm alert):

    Authentic hummus “It’s all about the paste”

    However, getting off my high horse on hummus etiquette, there are fun non-traditional flavors that make traditional hummus playful. In this version, I’ve swapped out garlic for a horseradish hummus. Horseradish is a root vegetable in the mustard family. Its root heritage makes it a piquant spice plus it offers multiple health benefits.

    This recipe also includes turmeric which blings out the color with a golden hue as well as adding interesting nutritional qualities. Lastly, this version has about half the oil as most hummus recipes without sacrificing flavor or texture.

    Golden Horseradish Hummus

     Golden Horseradish Hummus 

    Makes about 2 cups

    Ingredients:

    • 1 (15-ounce) can garbanzo beans (about 2 cups drained)
    • 2-3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (about 1 large lemon)
    • 2 tablespoons “prepared horseradish” (see notes below)
    • ¼ cup tahini
    • ½ teaspoon turmeric
    • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne
    • 3 tablespoons water
    • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • ⅛ teaspoon fine sea salt

    Steps:

    1. Drain the chickpeas and rinse. Reserve a few whole garbanzo beans for garnish.
    2. Combine the chickpeas with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor and blend to a creamy purée. You want a very smooth texture. If the texture is too thick, add a bit more water or olive oil. Tahini comes in varying degrees of textures.
    3. Taste and season further if needed.

    To serve, spread in a platter or put in a shallow bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, some chickpeas and serve with warmed flat breads or pita bread cut into quarters or with vegetable crudité.

      Golden Horseradish Hummus

    Substitutions: Taste and Nutrition considerations:

    • Horseradish “heat”: as with some other root vegetables, horseradish spicy or piquant notes increase with the amount of processing such as chopping, grinding, grating. A very finely grated horseradish will be spicier than the chopped root. The “heat” is from a volatile oil compound called isothiocyanate.
    • Types of Horseradish: “Prepared” or jarred horseradish” varies significantly in ingredients used, quality and flavor profiles. Refrigerated (fresh horseradish) has a shorter shelf life than the non-refrigerated options.
    • Ingredients: Shelf-stable options can include a variety of additional ingredients with some brands include eggs, artificial flavoring, preservatives such as sodium benzoate and extra oils. Also check the ingredient list for sugar or corn syrups (preservative roles) which can add an odd flavor to hummus.
    • Options: These extra ingredients aren’t offering any health benefits and alter the natural flavor and texture of horseradish. For a better quality product, consider the refrigerated versions which are most likely simply grated horseradish, salt and vinegar. The vinegar helps stabilize the volatile oils (released from grating the root) so that the “heat” doesn’t continue to evolve.

    More horseradish info at Food & Nutrition Magazine Savor Horseradish

    • Instead of a dip, use as a sandwich condiment spread
    • Use as in a layered veggie salad dish alternating the hummus with cucumbers, shredded carrots, peppers etc.
    • Use as a “mash” type of substitute to serve with other foods e.g. roasted vegetables or chicken.
    • Storage: Whether using prepared or homemade horseradish store in the refrigerator for 4-6 months or in the freezer for longer. I’ve kept fresh roots in the vegetable tray for up to 6 weeks.

    Thank you, horseradish, for being neither a radish nor a horse.

    What you are is a liar food.

    Jimmy Fallon

      About Me

      The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
      Michele Redmond

      Michele Redmond

      French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

      It's about Making Food First

      Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

      Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

      Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

      Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

      Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

      Dukkah, a savory spice and nut mix, has Arabic roots and worldly applications. Traditional key ingredients are nuts, coriander, cumin seed, salt and sesame seeds, but it can also include other seeds such as fennel and peppercorns. The word Dukkah is attributed to Arabic references to crush or turn to powder which can be done with a mortar and pestle or an electric spice grinder.

      • 1/3  cup whole unroasted hazelnuts
      • 1/3  cup unsalted whole unroasted almonds
      • 2  heaping tablespoons of sesame seeds
      • 2  tablespoons coriander seeds
      • 1  tablespoon cumin seeds
      • 1  teaspoon fennel seeds
      • 1  teaspoon black peppercorns
      • ½ teaspoon coarse sea salt (fleur de sel is nice)

      Steps: Preheat oven to 375°F

      1. Distribute the hazelnuts and almonds each to their own baking trays to control for cooking differences
      2. Toast nuts in the oven or toaster oven until lightly browned for 4-8 minutes, then remove from oven to cool. Rub the hazelnuts together in batches between your palms to remove most of the skin
      3. Chop the nuts into ⅛” size bits and add to a bowl. A bread knife helps to keep nuts from escaping
      4. Heat a skillet over medium heat and toast the sesame seeds until golden, remove
      5. Toss the spices into the skillet, shaking it a few times and heat the spices until they become aromatic
      6. Put the sesame seeds and spices in an electric grinder or mortar and pestle grind to a coarse powder
      7. Add the mixture to the chopped nuts. Sprinkle in the salt and stir.
      • Nutrient-dense food with high-satiety protein & healthful spices
      • Because of the natural oils in the nuts and sesame seeds, dukkah does not have a long shelf life but can be stored for a month in the refrigerator.
      • A spice blend of savory and nutty with hints of sweet and heat
      • Coriander adds a hint of lemon and wood notes
      • Crunchy textures from whole and crushed nuts and spices
      • Use as a dip for crudité: radishes, cucumbers, sweet peppers, green onions, jicama, carrots
      • Use as an dip for bread by combining olive oil with the Dukkah
      • Use as a seasoning topping for flat bread
      • Sprinkle on roasted vegetables
      • Add to a fresh grated carrot salad

      “A popular spice blend that modern Egyptians enjoy just as their ancestors did thousands of years ago”

       

      History.com Spice of Life in Egypt

        About Me

        The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
        Michele Redmond

        Michele Redmond

        French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

        It's about Making Food First

        Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas with Sumac

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

        This chickpea appetizer or snack creates bean lovers. The balanced spicy, citrusy and salty sensations with a crunchy bean exterior are crave-able features. The health benefits of the beans and spices are a bonus. Quick and easy to make, these can be made ahead of time or served hot and crunchy from the pan.

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

        Ingredients

        • 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
        • 1 tsp sumac (see spice notes for options)
        • 1 teaspoon ancho chile powder or chili powder
        • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
        • 1/4 teaspoon salt
        • 2 teaspoons of olive oil

        Steps:

        1. Heat the oven to 425°F (218C) and arrange a rack in the middle position.
        2. Rinse chickpeas in a colander and let drain while preparing the spice mix.
        3. Add the dry spices to a bowl that is larger than needed to hold the chickpeas.
        4. Use a paper towel and gently pat the chickpeas to dry them further. The drier the chickpeas, the more crisp they will be.
        5. Add the chickpeas to the bowl. Shake them sauté style a few times until coated.
        6. Add the oil to the chickpeas and gently stir the chickpeas.
        7. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and add chickpeas in an even layer.
        8. Once or twice during the baking, gently shake the baking sheet for more even cooking. Chickpeas with high internal moisture content will pop like hot popcorn, so be careful to not get zinged by a hot bean.
        9. Chickpeas will become crisp between 18-24 minutes. Place two layers of paper toweling on a large plate and when chickpeas are done, pour them onto the paper towel to cool down, then move to a dry bowl or plate to stay crisp. Some brands of chickpeas get very crisp and stay crisp and others lose the texture in a few hours.

        Nutrition Highlights:

        • Because of the fiber content, chickpeas are a high-satiety food–keeps you fuller for longer. One 15-ounce can provides about 25 grams of fiber.
        • High amounts of insoluble fiber that helps to create a health flora in your gut.
        • Fiber also helps control blood sugar changes and insulin secretion.

        Fried Option: This adds calories but is an option for even crispier chickpeas

        1. Rinse chickpeas in a colander and let drain while preparing the spice mix.
        2. Add the dry spices to a bowl that is larger than needed to hold the chickpeas.
        3. Use a paper towel and gently pat the chickpeas to dry them further. The drier the chickpeas, the more crisp they will be.
        4. Add the chickpeas and give them a sauté style shake a few times until the chickpeas are coated.
        5. Heat a 10-12” skillet or sauté pan over medium high heat and add the oil. When the oil begins to shimmer, carefully add the chickpeas.

        Spice Notes: The gorgeous purple-red spice mountain in the photo are dried and ground sumac berries. These add a tart-lemony element to dishes where lemon might be too strong or the moisture from lemon juice isn’t desired as in the case with these chickpeas. Sumac powder has increases your versatility in the kitchen, but if you don’t have it, go for a different spice profile and add some cumin or cumin plus coriander.

        Ancho chile powder (the rusto-brown spice mountain in the photo) adds a hint of a fruity element where chili powder (a blend of herbs and chiles) not present in chili powder blends.

         

        Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas with Sumac

        Gimme your Garbanzos or Chuck me the Chickpeas—either way they’re the same bean!

          About Me

          The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
          Michele Redmond

          Michele Redmond

          French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

          It's about Making Food First

          Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

          Cauliflower Broccoli Tabouli

          Cauliflower Broccoli Tabouli

          Cauliflower Broccoli Tabouli

          I prepared this at the Season for all Cooks 2015 Edible Education Series http://labellaterre.com/blogs/blog/17102032-a-season-for-all-cooks-the-2015-edible-education-series    A fellow from Lebanon commented that it made him think of his grandmother’s tabouli; I told him his grandmother must have liked spiced tabouli since this is an unusual version of the traditional dish.Califlower and broccoli tabouli

          Cauliflower and broccoli tabouli with pistachios and pomegranate seeds

           

          Cauliflower Broccoli Tabouli with Pistachios and Pomegranate
          Recipe Type: Salad
          Author: Chef Michele
          Serves: 4
          A salad of Lebanese origin traditionally made with cracked wheat (Bulgur), lots of parsley, mint, onions, tomatoes, lemon juice and olive oil. Here bulgur is replaced by cauliflower and broccoli and additional piquant spices are added along with crunchy nut element and a hint of sweet from pomegranate.
          Ingredients
          • 1 large cauliflower, base and leaves removed
          • 1 large broccoli stalk (about 1/3 the amount of the cauliflower)
          • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (about one lemon)
          • 1 large cucumber, peeled, quartered, seeds removed, then cut into 8 strips and diced (about 1 ½ cups)
          • 5-6 springs parsley, minced (about ¼ cup)
          • 2 spring onions, sliced in thin rounds
          • Lemon zest from one lemon
          • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
          • [br]
          • [b]Spice and seasoning mix[/b]
          • 2 teaspoons coriander
          • ¼ teaspoon allspice berries (about 6 berries)
          • ½ teaspoon of cumin seed
          • ¼ teaspoon of Aleppo chile flakes or red pepper flakes
          • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
          • [br]
          • [b]Garnishes:[/b]
          • Seeds from ¼ of a pomegranate
          • 1/3 cup toasted, salted pistachios
          Instructions
          1. Cut the cauliflower in quarters. Add the lemon juice to a mixing bowl, then hold the cauliflower by the base and using a cheese grater over the bowl, grate the florets against the larger holes (the grated size should be pieces that are about ⅛ inch). Stop grating if the results look like grated cheese strips and use the remaining stalks for a soup base or to roast.
          2. Grate the broccoli into the bowl in the same manner.
          3. Prepare the cucumbers, herbs, onions, lemon zest and add to the cauliflower mixture.
          4. Grind together the coriander, allspice berries and cumin seeds and toss into the cauliflower mixture along with the chile flakes and salt.
          5. Add the olive oil and stir well, then top with half the pomegranate seeds and pistachios and give a quick stir then toss the rest on top.

           

            About Me

            The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
            Michele Redmond

            Michele Redmond

            French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

            It's about Making Food First

            Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

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