Golden Horseradish Hummus

Golden Horseradish Hummus

Golden Horseradish Hummus

Golden Horseradish Hummus

Hummus needs chickpeas. I’ve met modern interpretations at restaurants and was disappointed when I could find no trace or taste of it.

Chickpeas have a distinct flavor and, culturally, if chickpeas are subbed out for other beans, you have bean dip, not hummus. Hummus “means chickpea in Arabic” so if you want authenticity, stick with the chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans).

Tahini, sesame paste, is also a sign of authenticity in hummus. For “proof”, click to see a short video spoof on commercially made versus homemade hummus–Warning the tune is addictive (earworm alert):

Authentic hummus “It’s all about the paste”

However, getting off my high horse on hummus etiquette, there are fun non-traditional flavors that make traditional hummus playful. In this version, I’ve swapped out garlic for a horseradish hummus. Horseradish is a root vegetable in the mustard family. Its root heritage makes it a piquant spice plus it offers multiple health benefits.

This recipe also includes turmeric which blings out the color with a golden hue as well as adding interesting nutritional qualities. Lastly, this version has about half the oil as most hummus recipes without sacrificing flavor or texture.

Golden Horseradish Hummus

 Golden Horseradish Hummus 

Makes about 2 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15-ounce) can garbanzo beans (about 2 cups drained)
  • 2-3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (about 1 large lemon)
  • 2 tablespoons “prepared horseradish” (see notes below)
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ⅛ teaspoon fine sea salt

Steps:

  1. Drain the chickpeas and rinse. Reserve a few whole garbanzo beans for garnish.
  2. Combine the chickpeas with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor and blend to a creamy purée. You want a very smooth texture. If the texture is too thick, add a bit more water or olive oil. Tahini comes in varying degrees of textures.
  3. Taste and season further if needed.

To serve, spread in a platter or put in a shallow bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, some chickpeas and serve with warmed flat breads or pita bread cut into quarters or with vegetable crudité.

  Golden Horseradish Hummus

Substitutions: Taste and Nutrition considerations:

  • Horseradish “heat”: as with some other root vegetables, horseradish spicy or piquant notes increase with the amount of processing such as chopping, grinding, grating. A very finely grated horseradish will be spicier than the chopped root. The “heat” is from a volatile oil compound called isothiocyanate.
  • Types of Horseradish: “Prepared” or jarred horseradish” varies significantly in ingredients used, quality and flavor profiles. Refrigerated (fresh horseradish) has a shorter shelf life than the non-refrigerated options.
  • Ingredients: Shelf-stable options can include a variety of additional ingredients with some brands include eggs, artificial flavoring, preservatives such as sodium benzoate and extra oils. Also check the ingredient list for sugar or corn syrups (preservative roles) which can add an odd flavor to hummus.
  • Options: These extra ingredients aren’t offering any health benefits and alter the natural flavor and texture of horseradish. For a better quality product, consider the refrigerated versions which are most likely simply grated horseradish, salt and vinegar. The vinegar helps stabilize the volatile oils (released from grating the root) so that the “heat” doesn’t continue to evolve.

More horseradish info at Food & Nutrition Magazine Savor Horseradish

  • Instead of a dip, use as a sandwich condiment spread
  • Use as in a layered veggie salad dish alternating the hummus with cucumbers, shredded carrots, peppers etc.
  • Use as a “mash” type of substitute to serve with other foods e.g. roasted vegetables or chicken.
  • Storage: Whether using prepared or homemade horseradish store in the refrigerator for 4-6 months or in the freezer for longer. I’ve kept fresh roots in the vegetable tray for up to 6 weeks.

Thank you, horseradish, for being neither a radish nor a horse.

What you are is a liar food.

Jimmy Fallon

About Me

The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

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Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Sumac

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Sumac

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Sumac

Roasted cauliflower with sumac

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Sumac

Pan-seared cauliflower steaks work great, yet often require finishing in the oven. This cauliflower steak with sumac option shortcuts the pan-searing for a longer, but less fussy, roast in the oven.

While these “C-steaks” may not satisfy a meat eater as a substitute, they will satisfy their appetite and offer meaty texture characteristics. The main stem of these veggie steaks offers a satisfying dense texture that contrasts with the crunchy outer florets and buttery softness of the smaller stems. So whether your diet is veg only or omni, cauliflower steaks can satisfy as a side or as a main dish when paired with complementary foods (see serving notes below).

Sumac is from dried and ground sumac berries. It’s a unique flavor, but you can use a combination of lemon juice and zest to mimic sumac’s lemon notes (see taste notes below) or use any seasoning or spice mix you prefer. Think about balancing cauliflowers sweet notes with something that offers a hint of sour and/or spicy heat.

Roasted cauliflower without sumac

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Sumac

Ingredients

  • 1 large cauliflower (2½-3 pounds)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Few pinches of fine sea salt (about ⅛ teaspoon)
  • 1 teaspoon ground sumac (optional but adds a soft tart or lemon flavor note)
  • A pinch of cayenne (about ¼ of an ⅛ teaspoon)

Steps:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F and arrange a rack to be on the lowest level.
  2. Pull off the outer leaves of the cauliflower but do not cut out the core of the cauliflower. Trim the stem a bit if this helps stabilize the base of the cauliflower flat against a cutting board.
  3. With a chef’s knife, slice the cauliflower from top to base in one nice cut (avoid see-sawing the blade back and forth to keep florets from breaking off the stems). Depending on the size of the head, you may be able to cut 3-4 steaks sized at ¾ inch-thick “steaks” from the main stem and larger branches. As you cut, some florets will fall off which you can also roast or keep for another use.
  4. Place the cauliflower on the baking sheet, drizzle both sides or each steak with the olive oil and then season with salt. If you prefer to use less oil, brush oil onto steaks with a pastry brush.
  5. Place the baking sheet on the bottom rack and cook until cauliflower is browned (about 12 minutes).
  6. Remove from the oven and, with a spatula, gently turn the steaks over. Sprinkle the sumac onto the steaks—the side facing up.
  7. Place back on the bottom rack to finish cooking (about 10-12 minutes) or until browned on both sides and stems feel tender—the thicker branches should yield to a knife when pierced.
  8. Serve warm or room temperature.

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Sumac

  • Cauliflower is a high satiety food with good fiber content, high protein content and low calorie values (107 calories for 4 cups chopped).
  • Glucosinolates and isothiocyanates phytochemicals and antioxidants found in cauliflower may be beneficial for inflammation-related health problems and play a role in its particular aroma and flavor.
  • Sumac adds bright red-purple colors and subtle hints of lemon or tang. It’s a great spice option for many dishes when lemons aren’t available or lemon juice isn’t the best form for delivering this taste and flavor element. Plus, lemons can add bitter notes.
  • Serve as a base for cooked grains or seeds such as quinoa
  • Top the steaks with a warm cannellini bean salad
  • Serve with salmon, chicken or fish
  • Serve without the sumac and instead a sauce like garlic walnut and herb sauce
Roasted cauliflower

Cauliflower is nothing but Cabbage with a College Education”

Mark Twain

About Me

The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

Almond and Hazelnut Dukkah

Dukkah, a savory spice and nut mix, has Arabic roots and worldly applications. Traditional key ingredients are nuts, coriander, cumin seed, salt and sesame seeds, but it can also include other seeds such as fennel and peppercorns. The word Dukkah is attributed to Arabic references to crush or turn to powder which can be done with a mortar and pestle or an electric spice grinder.

  • 1/3  cup whole unroasted hazelnuts
  • 1/3  cup unsalted whole unroasted almonds
  • 2  heaping tablespoons of sesame seeds
  • 2  tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 1  tablespoon cumin seeds
  • 1  teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1  teaspoon black peppercorns
  • ½ teaspoon coarse sea salt (fleur de sel is nice)

Steps: Preheat oven to 375°F

  1. Distribute the hazelnuts and almonds each to their own baking trays to control for cooking differences
  2. Toast nuts in the oven or toaster oven until lightly browned for 4-8 minutes, then remove from oven to cool. Rub the hazelnuts together in batches between your palms to remove most of the skin
  3. Chop the nuts into ⅛” size bits and add to a bowl. A bread knife helps to keep nuts from escaping
  4. Heat a skillet over medium heat and toast the sesame seeds until golden, remove
  5. Toss the spices into the skillet, shaking it a few times and heat the spices until they become aromatic
  6. Put the sesame seeds and spices in an electric grinder or mortar and pestle grind to a coarse powder
  7. Add the mixture to the chopped nuts. Sprinkle in the salt and stir.
  • Nutrient-dense food with high-satiety protein & healthful spices
  • Because of the natural oils in the nuts and sesame seeds, dukkah does not have a long shelf life but can be stored for a month in the refrigerator.
  • A spice blend of savory and nutty with hints of sweet and heat
  • Coriander adds a hint of lemon and wood notes
  • Crunchy textures from whole and crushed nuts and spices
  • Use as a dip for crudité: radishes, cucumbers, sweet peppers, green onions, jicama, carrots
  • Use as an dip for bread by combining olive oil with the Dukkah
  • Use as a seasoning topping for flat bread
  • Sprinkle on roasted vegetables
  • Add to a fresh grated carrot salad

“A popular spice blend that modern Egyptians enjoy just as their ancestors did thousands of years ago”

 

History.com Spice of Life in Egypt

About Me

The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Turkey Picadillo Lettuce Wraps

Turkey Picadillo Lettuce Wraps

Turkey Picadillo Lettuce Wraps

Picadillo is fun to say but better to eat. You can do both in Mexico, Cuba, the Philippines and other countries who’ve adopted this Spanish dish. It’s a wild mix of sweet, savory and pungent flavors influenced by its Moorish spice heritage.

Turkey picadillo lettuce

Picadillo varies by country, but it shares a common tradition of using minced beef or pork. However, this recipe goes poultry with turkey picadillo. The bold flavors elevate lean turkey and vegetarian soy crumbles are a good meatless option.

Turkey Picadillo Flavors and Textures

 

Traditional flavoring ingredients include olives, tomatoes, peppers, vinegar or lime and raisins. Yes, raisins in a meat dish. Historically, meat dishes with raisins trace back to 100 AD, so it’s not just a modern way to sneak a healthy fruit into this dish.

Typically picadillo is a comfort food served with tortillas or rice rather than a lettuce wrap. Yet, this version has texture contrasts that add to its “gotta make this again” appeal. Crisp, cool lettuce contrasted with warm, moist ingredients and surprises like crunchy peppers or soft chewy raisins.

Turkey Picadillo Lettuce Wraps

Five to six servings

Main Ingredients

  • 2  tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1  medium yellow onion, chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1  red bell pepper, diced or chopped (green is more traditional) 
  • 3  garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 ¼ pounds lean ground turkey
  • ¼  teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 15 ounce can small-dice tomatoes with juice (flame roasted is another option)
  • 1 ½  tablespoons tomato paste
  • ⅓ cup golden raisins, chopped
  • Lettuce cups from a large head of iceberg lettuce or romaine lettuce leaves

Spices and finishing garnishes

  • 1 teaspoon of dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne (if the cayenne is particularly hot, start with less)
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 ½ -2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (1 small lime)
  • 12-14 green olives, pitted, chopped
  • Couple pinches salt

Preparation

  1. Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, then add 1 tablespoon of olive oil. When oil is shimmering, add onion, bell pepper then toss on the garlic (a Cuban Sofrito) and cook w/ periodic stirring about 5 minutes until onion begins to brown.
  2. Push the vegetables away from the center of the pan, add another tablespoon of olive oil to the cleared area. Add the ground turkey, sprinkle on the salt and let brown on one side for additional flavor for about 4 minutes. Then break up with a spatula and continue to cook for 3 minutes. (If using low-fat turkey, it will not brown much).
  3. Add tomatoes and juice, tomato paste and raisins and spices and mix all the ingredients together. Once the liquids begin to simmer, reduce heat and cook for 10 minutes. Add lime juice and olives. Taste and adjust salt if needed. Serve in lettuce wraps.
  • Vegan/Vegetarian Version: Soy crumble substitutes replace the turkey without changing any other ingredients.
  • Raisins may seem like an odd pairing with a ground meat or poultry product, but in this dish it not only adds a texture contrast, but the subtle sweetness balances the acidity of the lime and tomatoes as well as the spicy heat.
  • Try to use only fresh lime rather than bottled as the acidity and flavor compounds are significantly different.
  • Serve in warmed corn or flour tortillas, with rice, on top of crispy corn tortillas or on bed of greens or as a stuffing for an acorn squash or baked green pepper.
  • Use for stuffing a poblano chili, tamales or empanadas.
  • Add Middle Eastern touch by using phyllo dough to make boreks.
  • For more Cuban flare serve with black beans, seared plantains or rice.

“Picadillo roughly translates from the Spanish as “mince”. The dish bears some resemblance to American Sloppy Joes” NY Times Ultimate Cuban Comfort Food

Sam Sifton, New York Times

About Me

The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas with Sumac

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

This chickpea appetizer or snack creates bean lovers. The balanced spicy, citrusy and salty sensations with a crunchy bean exterior are crave-able features. The health benefits of the beans and spices are a bonus. Quick and easy to make, these can be made ahead of time or served hot and crunchy from the pan.

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas

Ingredients

  • 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
  • 1 tsp sumac (see spice notes for options)
  • 1 teaspoon ancho chile powder or chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons of olive oil

Steps:

  1. Heat the oven to 425°F (218C) and arrange a rack in the middle position.
  2. Rinse chickpeas in a colander and let drain while preparing the spice mix.
  3. Add the dry spices to a bowl that is larger than needed to hold the chickpeas.
  4. Use a paper towel and gently pat the chickpeas to dry them further. The drier the chickpeas, the more crisp they will be.
  5. Add the chickpeas to the bowl. Shake them sauté style a few times until coated.
  6. Add the oil to the chickpeas and gently stir the chickpeas.
  7. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and add chickpeas in an even layer.
  8. Once or twice during the baking, gently shake the baking sheet for more even cooking. Chickpeas with high internal moisture content will pop like hot popcorn, so be careful to not get zinged by a hot bean.
  9. Chickpeas will become crisp between 18-24 minutes. Place two layers of paper toweling on a large plate and when chickpeas are done, pour them onto the paper towel to cool down, then move to a dry bowl or plate to stay crisp. Some brands of chickpeas get very crisp and stay crisp and others lose the texture in a few hours.

Nutrition Highlights:

  • Because of the fiber content, chickpeas are a high-satiety food–keeps you fuller for longer. One 15-ounce can provides about 25 grams of fiber.
  • High amounts of insoluble fiber that helps to create a health flora in your gut.
  • Fiber also helps control blood sugar changes and insulin secretion.

Fried Option: This adds calories but is an option for even crispier chickpeas

  1. Rinse chickpeas in a colander and let drain while preparing the spice mix.
  2. Add the dry spices to a bowl that is larger than needed to hold the chickpeas.
  3. Use a paper towel and gently pat the chickpeas to dry them further. The drier the chickpeas, the more crisp they will be.
  4. Add the chickpeas and give them a sauté style shake a few times until the chickpeas are coated.
  5. Heat a 10-12” skillet or sauté pan over medium high heat and add the oil. When the oil begins to shimmer, carefully add the chickpeas.

Spice Notes: The gorgeous purple-red spice mountain in the photo are dried and ground sumac berries. These add a tart-lemony element to dishes where lemon might be too strong or the moisture from lemon juice isn’t desired as in the case with these chickpeas. Sumac powder has increases your versatility in the kitchen, but if you don’t have it, go for a different spice profile and add some cumin or cumin plus coriander.

Ancho chile powder (the rusto-brown spice mountain in the photo) adds a hint of a fruity element where chili powder (a blend of herbs and chiles) not present in chili powder blends.

 

Spicy Crunchy Chickpeas with Sumac

Gimme your Garbanzos or Chuck me the Chickpeas—either way they’re the same bean!

About Me

The pleasure of food, good health and well-being through simple habits for eating well and flexitarian low-key cooking.
Michele Redmond

Michele Redmond

French-trained Chef, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Enjoyment Activist

It's about Making Food First

Get Taste Workshop periodic updates on easy ways to choose and cook foods that satisfy your appetite, nurture your body and make eating well a pleasure.

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